A Thousand and One Posts…Going on Vacation!

According to Wikipedia, a vacation is a leave of absence from a regular occupation, or a specific trip or journey, usually for the purpose of recreation or tourism. In the United Kingdom, the word vacation once specifically referred to the long summer break taken by the law courts and then later the term was applied to universities. The custom was introduced by William the Conqueror … Continue reading A Thousand and One Posts…Going on Vacation!

Post #1000: One Thousand (!)

As a number, one thousand seems rather insignificant. Most schools I have worked at in Thailand have had many times that number of students. A collection of just a thousand of anything seems fairly tiny. Even in terms of currency, it seems rather poor but that depends on which currency you are dealing with. The highest denomination banknote here in Thailand is one thousand baht. … Continue reading Post #1000: One Thousand (!)

Post #999: Coastwatchers in the Solomon Islands

The Coastwatchers, also known as the Coast Watch Organisation, Combined Field Intelligence Service or Section C, Allied Intelligence Bureau, were Allied military intelligence operatives stationed on remote Pacific islands during World War II to observe enemy movements and rescue stranded Allied personnel. They played a significant role in the Pacific Ocean theatre and South West Pacific theatre, particularly as an early warning network during the … Continue reading Post #999: Coastwatchers in the Solomon Islands

Post #998: World Water Day

World Water Day is an annual United Nations observance day (always on March 22) that highlights the importance of freshwater. The day is used to advocate for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. World Water Day is celebrated around the world with a variety of events. These can be educational, theatrical, musical or lobbying in nature. The day can also include campaigns to raise money … Continue reading Post #998: World Water Day

Post #997: Natalicio de Benito Juárez

March 21 is celebrated each year in México as Natalicio de Benito Juárez (Birth of Benito Juárez) to commemorate President Benito Juárez’s birthday on March 21, 1806. Juárez is popularly regarded as an exemplary politician because of his liberal policies that, among other things, defined the traditionally strict separation of the church and the Mexican state. Article 74 of the Mexican labor law (Ley Federal … Continue reading Post #997: Natalicio de Benito Juárez

Post #996: The Grenadines of St. Vincent

There have been two articles on A Stamp A Day about the British colony of St. Vincent and one about the independent St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Today’s featured stamp adds another issuing entity to the ASAD roster, that of The Grenadines of St. Vincent (although it the stamps for both are released under the direction of the Inter-Governmental Philatelic Corporation). The Grenadines are a … Continue reading Post #996: The Grenadines of St. Vincent

Post #995: Sydney Harbour Bridge

On March 19, 1932, the Sydney Harbour Bridge in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, opened. This is a heritage-listed steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbor, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney, … Continue reading Post #995: Sydney Harbour Bridge

St. Vincent and the Grenadines: Mickey’s School of Education

While I have had a stamp of the British Colony of St. Vincent in my collection for quite a while, it was only recently that I received one inscribed with the full independent name of St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The country achieved its independence from the British Commonwealth on October 27, 1979, but the first stamps with such a printed inscription weren’t released until … Continue reading St. Vincent and the Grenadines: Mickey’s School of Education