The Battle of Puebla and Cinco de Mayo

The Battle of Puebla (Batalla de Puebla) took place on May 5, 1862, near Puebla City during the Second French intervention in México. The battle ended in a victory for the Mexican Army over the occupying French soldiers. The French eventually overran the Mexicans in subsequent battles, but the Mexican victory at Puebla against a much better equipped and larger French army provided a significant … Continue reading The Battle of Puebla and Cinco de Mayo

Post #999: Coastwatchers in the Solomon Islands

The Coastwatchers, also known as the Coast Watch Organisation, Combined Field Intelligence Service or Section C, Allied Intelligence Bureau, were Allied military intelligence operatives stationed on remote Pacific islands during World War II to observe enemy movements and rescue stranded Allied personnel. They played a significant role in the Pacific Ocean theatre and South West Pacific theatre, particularly as an early warning network during the … Continue reading Post #999: Coastwatchers in the Solomon Islands

The Assassination of Julius Caesar

On March 15, 44 BC — the Ides of March — Julius Caesar, Dictator of the Roman Republic, was stabbed to death by several Roman senators. The assassination of Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by many senators led by Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, and Marcus Junius Brutus. They stabbed Caesar (23 times) to death in a location adjacent to the … Continue reading The Assassination of Julius Caesar

The Mining Disaster at Courrières

The Courrières mine disaster, Europe’s worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. A coaldust explosion, the cause of which is not known with certainty, devastated a coal mine operated by the Compagnie des mines de houille … Continue reading The Mining Disaster at Courrières

The Spanish “Find” Copán

On March 8, 1576, Spanish explorer Diego García de Palacio first sighted the ruins of the ancient Mayan city of Copán. This is an archaeological site of the Maya civilization in western Honduras, not far from the border with Guatemala. Today, it lies within the municipality of Copán Ruinas in the department of Copán. It is in a fertile valley among foothills at 2,300 feet … Continue reading The Spanish “Find” Copán

Hernán Cortés & His Conquest of the Aztec Empire

On March 4, 1519, Hernán Cortés arrived in México in search of the Aztec civilization and its wealth. The expedition (entrada) of Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano, Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca, caused the fall of the Aztec Empire and brought large portions of what is now mainland México under the rule of the King of Castile in the early … Continue reading Hernán Cortés & His Conquest of the Aztec Empire