Ross Dependency, Scott Base, and HMNZS Endeavour

The Ross Dependency is a region of Antarctica defined by a sector originating at the South Pole, passing along longitudes 160° east to 150° west, and terminating at latitude 60° south. It is claimed by New Zealand. Since the Antarctic Treaty came into force in 1961, Article IV of which states: “No acts or activities taking place while the present Treaty is in force shall … Continue reading Ross Dependency, Scott Base, and HMNZS Endeavour

Michelangelo: Painter, Sculptor, Architect

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni — more commonly known solely by his first name Michelangelo — was born on March 6, 1475, in Caprese, known today as Caprese Michelangelo, a small town situated in Valtiberina, near Arezzo, Tuscany. He would become an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet of the High Renaissance born in the Republic of Florence, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the … Continue reading Michelangelo: Painter, Sculptor, Architect

King Kong’s Film Debut

On March 2, 1933, the film King Kong opened at New York’s Radio City Music Hall to rave reviews. Directed and produced by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack, the screenplay by James Ashmore Creelman and Ruth Rose was developed from an idea conceived by Cooper and Edgar Wallace. It stars Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot and Robert Armstrong. It has been ranked by Rotten … Continue reading King Kong’s Film Debut

The Britten-Norman Trislander

On February 23, 532, Byzantine emperor Justinian I ordered the building of a new Orthodox Christian basilica in Constantinople which would become the Hagia Sophia. That is what I had planned to write about today. However, every stamp in my collection that I thought depicted the Hagie Sophia in fact portrayed some other mosque in Istanbul or elsewhere in Turkey, none of which I felt … Continue reading The Britten-Norman Trislander

The Iron Pagoda of Kaifeng

The Iron Pagoda (鐵塔) of Youguo Temple (佑國寺) in Kaifeng (開封), a prefecture-level city in east-central Henan province, China, is a Buddhist Chinese pagoda built in 1049 during the Northern Song dynasty (960–1279) of China. The pagoda is so-named not because it is made of iron, but because its color resembles that of iron. It is a brick pagoda tower built on the location of … Continue reading The Iron Pagoda of Kaifeng

Huckleberry Finn

On February 18, 1885, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain was published in the United States after initially being published in the United Kingdom and Canada on December 10, 1884. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the … Continue reading Huckleberry Finn

The Galápagos Islands Become Part of Ecuador

The Galápagos Islands were annexed by the Republic of Ecuador (República del Ecuador) on February 12, 1832. The first governor of Galápagos, General José de Villamil, brought a group of convicts to populate the island of Floreana, and in October 1832, some artisans and farmers joined them. Today also happens to be the birth anniversary of Charles Darwin, the English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best … Continue reading The Galápagos Islands Become Part of Ecuador