Stephen Watts Kearny, the Capture of Santa Fe and the Taos Revolt

On August 18, 1846, United States Army General Stephen W. Kearny and his troops took possession of Santa Fe — the capital of the Mexican Province of Nuevo México — graciously if sadly welcomed by acting governor Juan Bautista Vigil y Alarid. This Capture of Santa Fe is also known as the Battle of Santa Fe or the Battle of Cañoncito, despite no shots having been … Continue reading Stephen Watts Kearny, the Capture of Santa Fe and the Taos Revolt

New Mexico’s State Flag

Today is the 106th anniversary of New Mexico Statehood. New Mexico (Nuevo México in Spanish or Yootó Hahoodzo in Navajo) was admitted to the United States as its 47th state on January 6, 1912, having been a Territory since September 9, 1850. Occupying 121,412 square miles (314,460 km²) of land in the southwest region of the U.S.A., it is often incorrectly believed to have taken its name from … Continue reading New Mexico’s State Flag

Pancho Villa’s Raid on New Mexico

I lived in the state of New Mexico for more than a decade prior to moving to Thailand. There are many things I love about the region, including the rich history dating back to long before it became a territory of the United States. Just four years following its admission as the 47th state of the Union on January 6, 1912, the tiny border town … Continue reading Pancho Villa’s Raid on New Mexico

United States #1191 (1962)

New Mexico Statehood

New Mexico (Nuevo México in Spanish and Yootó Hahoodzo in Navajo) was admitted to the United States as the 47th state on January 6, 1912. Occupying 121,412 square miles (314,460 km²) of land in the southwest region of the U.S.A., it is usually considered one of the Mountain States. New Mexico is often incorrectly believed to have taken its name from the nation of Mexico. Spanish explorers recorded … Continue reading New Mexico Statehood

United States #1028 (1953)

Gadsden Purchase

The Gadsden Purchase (known in Mexico as Venta de La Mesilla, “Sale of La Mesilla”) is a 29,670-square-mile (76,800 km²) region of present-day southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico that the United States purchased via a treaty signed on December 30, 1853 by James Gadsden, American ambassador to Mexico at that time, The purchase included lands south of the Gila River and west of the Rio … Continue reading Gadsden Purchase

United States #976 (1948)

Establishment of Fort Bliss, Texas

On November 7, 1848, United States War Department General Order No. 58 ordered the establishment of an army post across from El Paso del Norte (now Ciudad Juárez), the largest settlement in the independent Mexican territory of Santa Fe de Nuevo México. The United States had inherited the unenforced claim to the east bank with the Texas Annexation in 1845. The U.S. Army under Stephen Kearny occupied … Continue reading Establishment of Fort Bliss, Texas

United States #898 (1940)

de Soto and Coronado (1540-1542)

On October 18, 1540, Spanish explorer and conquistador Hernando de Soto — leading the first European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States — arrived at Mabila, a heavily fortified village situated on a plain in a region of present-day central Alabama. Mabila was a Trojan-horse, fake village concealing over 2500 native warriors, planning to attack de Soto’s expedition. Tuskaloosa was a paramount chief of … Continue reading de Soto and Coronado (1540-1542)