John Wise and America’s First Air Mail Flight

The United States Postal Service commemorated the 100th anniversary of its Air Mail services with two stamps released earlier this year. However, mail had been transported by air long before the Army pilots in their Curtiss Jenny JN-4HM “Jenny” biplanes made their fights on May 15, 1918. The first airmail flight in the United States actually occurred nearly 60 years before in Lafayette, Indiana. While … Continue reading John Wise and America’s First Air Mail Flight

Louis Blériot and the First Flight Across the English Channel

On July 25, 1909, French aviator, inventor and engineer Louis Blériot made the first flight across the English Channel in a heavier-than-air machine from Calais, France to Dover, England, in 37 minutes. Unfortunately, due to my American-centric education I suppose and despite a boyhood interest in aviation as it pertained to the Wright Brothers and Lindbergh, I don’t recall ever hearing about Blériot until I … Continue reading Louis Blériot and the First Flight Across the English Channel

Lindy Tours the U.S.A. (Part 2)

Yesterday’s ASAD article covered the period starting with Charles Lindbergh’s return to the United States on June 11, 1927, following his non-stop solo flight across the Atlantic from New York to Paris three weeks before. A chronological accounting of first month of the Guggenheim Goodwill Mission, from July 20 through his arrival at Madison, Wisconsin, on August 22, also formed the bulk of that entry. … Continue reading Lindy Tours the U.S.A. (Part 2)

Lindbergh Takes Europe by Storm

At 10:22 PM local time on Saturday, May 21, 1927, Charles Augustus Lindbergh landed his Ryan single-engine monoplane Spirit of St. Louis on the ground at Aérodrome de Le Bourget in Paris, France, completing the first solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean. He had begun his journey 33 hours, 30 minutes and 29.8 seconds before — lifting his aircraft from the muddy runway of Roosevelt Airfield … Continue reading Lindbergh Takes Europe by Storm

Lucky Lindy Flies the Atlantic!

At 7:52 on the rainy morning of May 20, 1927, a 25-year-old former U.S. Air Mail pilot with the nickname of Slim taxied his single-engine Ryan monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis, down the muddy runway at Roosevelt Airfield near Garden City on Long Island, New York. Taking off in relative obscurity, 33 hours, 30 minutes later Charles Augustus Lindbergh landed at Aéroport Le Bourget in … Continue reading Lucky Lindy Flies the Atlantic!