The Zebra

Zebras are several species of African equids (horse family) united by their distinctive black and white striped coats. Their stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small harems to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses and donkeys, zebras have never been truly domesticated. There are three species of zebras: the plains zebra, the mountain … Continue reading The Zebra

Zambezia #13 (1898)

Zambezia was a district of Mozambique Province and a part of the Portuguese East Africa Colony.  The Portuguese government-issued separate postage stamps for it starting in 1894. The postal districts of Quelimane and Tete were created from parts of Zambezia in about 1913. Mozambique stamps replaced stamps of Zambezia around 1920. Currently, Zambezia is the second most-populous province of Mozambique, located in the central coastal region south-west of Nampula Province and north-east of Sofala Province. It had a population of 3,85 million as … Continue reading Zambezia #13 (1898)

Mozambique Company #165 (1935)

One of the very first stamps I remember adding to my stamp collection as a boy of nine or ten was a stamp from the Mozambique Company, one of those stamp-issuing entities that wasn’t even a colony or country. The stamp was a beautifully-engraved bicolored stamp, in a triangular shape and pictured a coiled snake — a rock python. I don’t recall the denomination or colors; … Continue reading Mozambique Company #165 (1935)

São Tomé & Príncipe #530 (1979)

The Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe (República Democrática de São Tomé e Príncipe), is a Portuguese-speaking island nation in the Gulf of Guinea, off the western equatorial coast of Central Africa. It consists of two archipelagos around the two main islands: São Tomé is located about 155 miles (250 kilometers) and Príncipe 140 miles (225 km) off the northwestern coast of Gabon. The two … Continue reading São Tomé & Príncipe #530 (1979)

Quelimane #30 (1914)

Quelimane #30 (1914)

Quelimane was a district of the province of Zambezia, itself a part of Portuguese East Africa. Its boundaries corresponded roughly with those of the present-day Zambézia Province of the Republic of Mozambique (República de Moçambique in Portuguese), covering an area of approximately 39,800 square miles (103,082 square kilometers). Much of the area is drained by the Zambezi River and is extremely prone to floods during … Continue reading Quelimane #30 (1914)

Mozambique #284 (1938)

Mozambique #284 (1938)

Portuguese Mozambique or Portuguese East Africa (Moçambique or África Oriental Portuguesa) are the common terms by which Mozambique is designated when referring to the historic period when it was a Portuguese overseas territory. Portuguese Mozambique constituted a string of Portuguese colonies and later a single Portuguese overseas province along the south-east African coast, which now forms the Republic of Mozambique (República de Moçambique).  It was … Continue reading Mozambique #284 (1938)

Azores #315a (1980)

The Autonomous Region of the Azores (Região Autónoma dos Açores), is one of the two autonomous regions of Portugal, composed of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic Ocean about 850 miles (1,360 kilometers) west of continental Portugal.  The nine major Azorean islands and an islet cluster, are in three main groups: Flores and Corvo, to the west; Graciosa, Terceira, São Jorge, Pico, and Faial in … Continue reading Azores #315a (1980)

Angra #2 (1892)

Angra #2 (1892)

Angra or, to use it’s full name, Angra do Heroísmo, is a city on the island of Terceira in the Portuguese Autonomous Region of the Azores (Região Autónoma dos Açores).  The town was established in the latter half of the 15th century.  Angra is the Portuguese word for “inlet”, “cove”, or “bay”.  The epithet do Heroísmo (“of Heroism”, “the Heroic”) was granted to the city by Maria … Continue reading Angra #2 (1892)