Anglo-Egyptian Sudan & Its Iconic Camel Postman

The Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (السودان الإنجليزي المصري‎ — as-Sūdān al-Inglīzī al-Maṣrī) was a condominium of the United Kingdom and Egypt in the eastern Sudan region of northern Africa between 1899 and 1956, but in practice the structure of the condominium ensured full British control over the Sudan with Egypt having local influence instead. It attained independence as the Republic of the Sudan, which since 2011 has … Continue reading Anglo-Egyptian Sudan & Its Iconic Camel Postman

Wildebeest (Gnu)

The wildebeest, also called gnu, is a genus of antelopes, scientific name Connochaetes. It belongs to the family Bovidae, which includes antelopes, cattle, goats, sheep and other even-toed horned ungulates. Connochaetes includes two species, both native to Africa: the black wildebeest, or white-tailed gnu (C. gnou); and the blue wildebeest, or brindled gnu (C. taurinus). Fossil records suggest these two species diverged about one million … Continue reading Wildebeest (Gnu)

Baobab Tree

Adansonia is a genus of deciduous trees known as baobabs. They are found in arid regions of Madagascar, mainland Africa, Arabia, and Australia. The generic name honors Michel Adanson, the French naturalist and explorer who described Adansonia digitata. Of the nine species accepted as of April 2018, six are native to Madagascar, two are native to mainland Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, and one is native to Australia. One of the mainland African species also occurs on Madagascar, … Continue reading Baobab Tree

Bongo Antelope

The bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus) is a herbivorous, mostly nocturnal forest ungulate. It is among the largest of the African forest antelope species. Bongos are characterized by a striking reddish-brown coat, black and white markings, white-yellow stripes and long slightly spiraled horns. Indeed, bongos are the only tragelaphid in which both sexes have horns. They have a complex social interaction and are found in African dense … Continue reading Bongo Antelope

The Giraffe

Riding the local version of a bus (called a songtesaw, meaning “three seats”) to work today, I decided I wanted to write a “random stamp day” article about giraffes. I felt it would be an “easy” topic compared with the recent marathons involved putting together the articles on Jamestown (more than 11,000 words) and Air Mail/Inverted Jenny (almost 6200 words). I need to do a few … Continue reading The Giraffe